Exclusive Interview: Frybread Face & Me filmmaker Billy Luther “when it comes down to it, this is my story”

One of the standouts at the 48th Toronto International Film Festival, Billy Luther’s richly evocative 1990-set narrative feature debut Frybread Face and Me, was recently acquired by Ava DuVernay’s ARRAY Releasing and will open in select theaters and launch on Netflix on Friday, November 24th. The comedy drama follows 11-year-old Benny (Keir Tallman) as he... Continue Reading →

MQFF33 Film Review: Our Son ★★★★

Luke Evans and Billy Porter deliver powerful performances in writer-director Bill Oliver’s gay divorce drama Our Son. Bringing to mind classics like Kramer vs Kramer and the more recent Marriage Story, Our Son adds the well-observed specificity of middle-class gay city life into the fraught mix.  Gabriel (Porter) and Nicky (Evans) have a seemingly picture... Continue Reading →

Exclusive Interview: Oscar-winning filmmaker Roger Ross Williams “the real Cassandro is such a proud, out, gay man who embraces everything about who he is”

When Roger Ross Williams met Saúl Armendáriz, better known as Cassandro, for a 2016 documentary he was directing for The New Yorker—The Man Without a Mask—the filmmaker immediately knew he'd found the subject of his first scripted narrative feature. Making the move from amateur wrestling in El Paso, Armendáriz became a Mexican-American icon with the... Continue Reading →

TIFF 2023: LGBTQ+ highlights at 48th​ ​Toronto​ ​International​ ​Film​ ​Festival​

The 48th Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF) opens on Thursday, September 7th with the international premiere of Oscar-winning director Hayao Miyazaki's animated epic The Boy and the Heron (Kimitachi wa Do Ikiruka) and comes to a close on Sunday, September 17th with the world premiere of Thom Zimny's Sylvester Stallone documentary Sly, exploring the close... Continue Reading →

Exclusive Interview: Heartstopper director Euros Lyn “we wanted to do something different with season two”

As the second season of hit series Heartstopper based on Alice Oseman's bestselling graphic novels launches globally on Netflix this week, The Queer Review's editor James Kleinmann speaks exclusively with its BAFTA-winning director Euros Lyn. In the opening episode, we're reunited with new boyfriends in the midst of first love, Charlie (Joe Locke) and Nick... Continue Reading →

Exclusive Interview: Georgia Oakley & Rosy McEwen on 1980s-set lesbian drama Blue Jean “what happens in the film is still so relevant”

Writer-director Georgia Oakley’s impressive directorial debut Blue Jean is a compelling character study set in northern England in 1988, as Margaret Thatcher’s Conservative government is about to pass the notorious Section 28 of the local Government Act which stigmatized the nation's gay and lesbian population, stoking homophobia—both societal and internal—at the height of the HIV/AIDS... Continue Reading →

Exclusive Interview: Craig Boreham on his brooding queer Australian indie Lonesome “I wanted to put honest representations of sex on screen”

Declared "a strong new voice in Australian queer cinema” by The Guardian, filmmaker Craig Boreham's debut feature Teenage Kicks premiered at the 2016 Sydney Film Festival, where it was an Audience Award runner-up. It went on to win two Iris Prize trophies and saw Boreham nominated for an Australian Directors Guild Award. The writer-director's remarkable... Continue Reading →

Exclusive Interview: filmmaker Lukas Dhont on his Academy Award-nominated Close “I’ve been dreaming about the Oscars since I was young”

Following its Grand Prix-winning premiere at Cannes, writer-director Lukas Dhont's tender, heartbreaking, and healing sophomore feature Close, has gone on to be acclaimed at festivals around the world, and is among the five works nominated as Best International Feature Film at this weekend's 95th Academy Awards. Beautifully shot by cinematographer Frank van den Eeden, Close... Continue Reading →

Exclusive Interview: filmmaker Goran Stolevski on queer romance Of An Age “it’s more emotionally autobiographical than literal”

Writer-director-editor Goran Stolevski's achingly romantic and emotionally potent sophomore feature, Of An Age, opened Queer Screen's 30th Mardi Gras Film Festival this week and is playing in US cinemas from today. The Macedonian-born, Australian-raised queer filmmaker followed his Sundance award-winning short, Would You Look At Her, by directing several episodes of the fourth season of... Continue Reading →

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